Annual Reports  >  2013  > Financial Information > Parent Company ...> NOTES TO PARENT COMPANY ONLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
Parent Company Only Financial Statements for the Years Ended December 31, 2013 and 2012
and Independent Auditors’ Report
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NOTES TO PARENT COMPANY ONLY FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2013 AND 2012

33.

FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

a.

Categories of financial instruments

b.

Financial risk management objectives

The Company seeks to ensure sufficient cost-efficient funding readily available when needed. The Company manages its exposure to foreign currency risk, interest rate risk, equity price risk, credit risk and liquidity risk with the objective to reduce the potentially adverse effects the market uncertainties may have on its financial performance.

The plans for material treasury activities are reviewed by Audit Committees and/or Board of Directors in accordance with procedures required by relevant regulations or internal controls. During the implementation of such plans, Corporate Treasury function must comply with certain treasury procedures that provide guiding principles for overall financial risk management and segregation of duties.

c.

Market risk

The Company is exposed to the market risks arising from changes in foreign exchange rates, interest rates and the prices in equity investments, and utilizes some derivative financial instruments to reduce the related risks.

Foreign currency risk

Most of the Company’s operating activities are denominated in foreign currencies. Consequently, the Company is exposed to foreign currency risk. To protect against reductions in value and the volatility of future cash flows caused by changes in foreign exchange rates, the Company utilizes derivative financial instruments, including currency forward contracts and cross currency swaps, to hedge its currency exposure. These instruments help to reduce, but do not eliminate, the impact of foreign currency exchange rate movements.

The Company also holds short-term borrowings in foreign currencies in proportion to its expected future cash flows. This allows foreign-currency-denominated borrowings to be serviced with expected future cash flows and provides a partial hedge against transaction translation exposure.

The Company’s sensitivity analysis to foreign currency risk mainly focuses on the foreign currency monetary items at the end of the reporting period. Assuming an unfavorable 10% movement in the levels of foreign exchanges against the New Taiwan dollar, the net income for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 would have decreased by NT$156,590 thousand and NT$707,926 thousand, respectively, after taking into consideration of the hedging contracts and the hedged items.

Interest rate risk

The Company is exposed to interest rate risk arising from borrowing at fixed interest rates. All of the Company’s long-term bonds have fixed interest rates and are measured at amortized cost. As such, changes in interest rates would not affect the future cash flows.

Other price risk

The Company is exposed to equity price risk arising from available-for-sale equity investments.

Assuming a hypothetical decrease of 5% in equity prices of the equity investments at the end of the reporting period, the net income for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 would have been unaffected as they were classified as available-for-sale; however, the other comprehensive income for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 would have decreased by NT$47,150 thousand and NT$97,492 thousand, respectively.

d.

Credit risk management

Credit risk refers to the risk that a counterparty will default on its contractual obligations resulting in financial loss to the Company. The Company is exposed to credit risk from operating activities, primarily trade receivables, and from financing activities, primarily deposits, fixed-income investments and other financial instruments with banks. Credit risk is managed separately for business related and financial related exposures. As of the end of the reporting period, the Company’s maximum credit risk exposure is mainly from the carrying amount of financial assets recognized in the parent company only balance sheet.

Business related credit risk

The Company has considerable trade receivables outstanding with its customers worldwide. A substantial majority of the Company’s outstanding trade receivables are not covered by collateral or credit insurance. While the Company has procedures to monitor and limit exposure to credit risk on trade receivables, there can be no assurance such procedures will effectively limit its credit risk and avoid losses. This risk is heightened during periods when economic conditions worsen.

As of December 31, 2013 and 2012 and January 1, 2012, the Company’s ten largest customers accounted for 56%, 55% and 59% of accounts receivable, respectively. The Company believes the concentration of credit risk is insignificant for the remaining accounts receivable.

Financial credit risk

The Company regularly monitors and reviews the transaction limit applied to counterparties and adjusts the concentration limit according to market conditions and the credit standing of the counterparties. The Company mitigates its exposure by selecting counterparties with investment-grade credit ratings.

e.

Liquidity risk management

The objective of liquidity risk management is to ensure the Company has sufficient liquidity to fund its business requirements associated with existing operations over the next 12 months. The Company manages its liquidity risk by maintaining adequate cash and banking facilities.

As of December 31, 2013 and 2012 and January 1, 2012, the unused of financing facilities of the Company amounted to NT$67,437,805 thousand, NT$46,273,762 thousand and NT$55,424,367 thousand, respectively.

The table below summarizes the maturity profile of the Company’s financial liabilities based on contractual undiscounted payments, including principles and interests.

f.

Fair value of financial instruments

1)

Fair value of financial instruments carried at amortized cost

Except as detailed in the following table, the Company considers that the carrying amounts of financial assets and financial liabilities recognized in the parent company only financial statements approximate their fair values.

2) Fair value measurements recognized in the parent company only balance sheets

The following table provides an analysis of financial instruments that are measured subsequent to initial recognition at fair value, grouped into Levels 1 to 3 based on the degree to which the fair value is observable:

  • Level 1 fair value measurements are those derived from quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities;
  • Level 2 fair value measurements are those derived from inputs other than quoted prices included within Level 1 that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly (i.e. as prices) or indirectly (i.e. derived from prices); and
  • Level 3 fair value measurements are those derived from valuation techniques that include inputs for the asset or liability that are not based on observable market data (unobservable inputs).



There were no transfers between Level 1 and 2 for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

There were no purchases and disposals for assets on Level 3 for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

3)

Valuation techniques and assumptions used in fair value measurement

The fair values of financial assets and financial liabilities are determined as follows:

  • The fair values of financial assets and financial liabilities with standard terms and conditions and traded on active liquid markets are determined with reference to quoted market prices (includes publicly traded stocks).
  • Forward exchange contracts and cross currency swap contracts are measured using quoted forward exchange rates and yield curves derived from quoted interest rates matching maturities of the contracts.
  • The fair values of other financial assets and financial liabilities are determined in accordance with generally accepted pricing models based on discounted cash flow analysis.